Reconstruction (1865-1877)

 

Between the end of the Civil War and 1868 the General Assembly tried three times to compose a state constitution and laws acceptable to the federal government. It succeeded on the third try in January 1869. Reconstruction officially ended in Georgia when the state was readmitted to the Union by the U.S. Congress on July 15, 1870. The federal govern­ment. however, continued to dictate political policies in Georgia for several more years. Its aim was, of course, to assure that black citizens of the state were represented by black persons in the state capitol.

 

Simon Alexander Fraser was state representative for Liberty County from 1863 through 1866. There appears to have been no state representative for the county in 1867.

 

The branch office of the freedmens bureau in Liberty County appointed William A. Golden, a black man, state representative for Liberty County in 1868. He was unseated by the General Assembly in September 1869 when J.W. Farmer, a white physician, was elected state representative by Liberty County voters.

 

Farmer was unseated and Golden returned to his seat in the General Assembly by an Act of the U. S. Congress in 1870. The following year, however, Farmer returned to the General Assembly and served as state representative for Liber­ty County until the end of 1872, when Hendley Foxworth Horne, a white man, was elected to succeed him.

 

Horne's tenure was cut short and Golden was once again returned to his seat and served as state representative for Liberty County in 1873 and 1874. W.C. Bacon, a white man was elected state representative for Liberty County in 1875 and served through 1877.

 

C.F. Fletcher, a white man, was state senator for Liberty County from 1861 to 1863. William B. Gaulden, also a white man, served in the same position from 1863 until the end of the Civil War. Alexander W. Daley, a white man. was state senator for Liberty County from the end of the Civil War until 1867, when the branch of the freedmens bureau in Liberty County appointed Tunis G. Campbell, a black man, to replace him.

 

Campbell was unseated by the General Assembly in Sep­tember 1868, and W. Robert Gignilliat , a white man, was elected to replace him Gignilliat was unseated in September 1869. Campbell was reseated in 1870 and served in the posi­tion through 1872.  

 


From "Sweet Land of Liberty, A History of Liberty County, Georgia" by Robert Long Groover; Page(s) 53-54; Used by the permission of the Liberty County Commissioners Office 

 

LIBERTY COUNTY GEORGIA

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Mailing Address

Liberty County Historical Society
PO Box 982
Hinesville, GA  31310

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